DRAPER'S PAPERS of KY

Subject:
       Re: Draper's Ky Papers - Ball,Prickett,Morristown east Cincinnati
       1790-95
   Date:
       Fri, 28 Dec 2001 21:20:59 -0500
  From:
       HERMON B FAGLEY <hermfagley@juno.com>
    To:
       barich@fuse.net, russcanter@fuse.net, SusiCP@aol.com, flyingw@bright.net,
       bobfagley@sisna.com, watalley@kih.net, AOFN234@aol.com,
       KDMS@aol.com, wfamolim@attbi.com, mari@netins.net,
       EarlRoss@Prodigy.net, petemann32@aol.com, jmarksbury@deerfield.edu,
       tomluce@fuse.net, Wmfairfax@aol.com,
 
 
 

Barbara Applegate Richards,my Latin classmate ,posts the
following.
She,and my grand daughter live in the area. Col Ely Hill's
on the hills
to the
south ,
This is on the lower Little Miami River bottoms.  1790-95
eastern
Cincinnati.
Henry Ball,or sometimes read as Bull,as the ink flakes off
the old
quill pen script  a. -

On Fri, 28 Dec 2001 20:30:14 -0500 BA <barich@fuse.net>
writes:
> Draper's Kentucky Papers - Interview with Flinn
> Read from film 13 CC 101+
> Transcribed word for word using all original punctuation.
> Underlined words placed in all Caps for
> easier reading with email transmission.  - BAR
>
> FLINN     [no first name given - BAR]
>
>  Grandfather named WILLIAM  His son WM.: killed with
SKY[CE-] on the
> Ohio,  April 1793.
>
> OLCUTT, shot through the shoulder.   JAMES NEWELL, killed.
Had
> been thrown.  HENRY BALL  taken
> prisoner.
>
> Back-water was up very high.  They went up in a piroque
and brought
> him down next morning not yet
> dead.  He was killed by MRS. FERRIS',  this side the
middle gate
> (turnpike gate)  JAMES NEWELL, my
> Uncle's wife's brother.
>
> ROBERT GIFFIN was killed alone.  His father had brot down
a large
> family from Pa;  He had gone out a
> hunting.  Had killed a Turkey and Raccoon.  = Old MR. PAUL
was
> killed a week or so before or after.
> His son had like to have gotten killed at the same time.
-= This was
> on another branch of Duck Creek
> from MRS.FERRIS'   just below DR.DUNCAN's place - on it
now- about
> 1.2 miles below Madison.   GIFFIN
> had been living at my father's before he was killed, and
was living
> with my mother at this time.
> Was on his return home at this time
>
> NELSON'S STATION was about 100 yards just in front of this
> [?mound] where JOHN FERRIS lives.  I
> think this station must have been established as early as
1791.
> After ROBERT GIFFIN's death,  his
> father and brother's family moved to NELSON'S STATION.
ALEXANDER
> GORDON'S children were taken
> while they lived at this station.  Think they were out
after the
> cows.
>
> MUD STATION was about a mile above MIDDLETOWN STATION
which was just
> where TURPIN  now lives,  and
> was half-way between Columbia & NEWTOWN STATION.
>
> MORRISTOWN STATION was about half way between NELSON, and
the point
> of the hill at Columbia.
>
> BOWMAN pursued 2 INDIANS whom he heard GOBBLING on the top
of the
> hill, at the point there.  Had his
> 2 dogs with him.  Crawled up and shot one, and set his
dogs upon
> them.  Supposed he killed the one
> he wounded.
>
> There were 14 Indians, and 13 horsees which had been taken
the time
> of the [?r]acing between my
> Uncle JAMES and the Indians.  My uncle had pursued them
out to
> PIQUA PLAINS, on Scioto.  It was in
> 1793 or 94.  Professedly friendly Indians.  But it was
they that did
> the mischief,  for some of the
> things were found there.  Indians said he run like a
bullit,  at the
> time he came in.  JAMES.
> There were [?6] of the company that pursued.
>
> JACOB PARCHMAN, after we had come down in the spring of
17[?8]9, had
> gone out one day to hunt.
> While he was out, the indians had been in at Washington,
or
> Maysville, and stolen horses.  When he
> came in that night, he knew nothing of it, and went out
again the
> next day.  He met  with the
> indians.  & saw them pass and recognized one of the
horses.  He now
> thought to kill one at any rate,
> and escape to the town after firing.  He made toward the
top of the
> hill,  and as he was crossing a
> run, in a little hollow, just as he sprang, was shot in
the back.
> Supposed this to be the
> statement.
>
> JAMES SEWARD came out from Columbia about to watch a lick,
> afterwards known by his name.  While
> behind the blind he saw 2 x 2 x 2 Indians coming.  He ran
& they
> pursued up a rising ground.  They
> shot him in the shoulder and he dodged behind a log.  The
nettles,
> wild-rye, and pea-vine on the
> ridge side, rising near as high as his head.  They had
stopped to
> load, after shooting, and he got
> away.  The Lick was about 5 miles from Columbia, on Indian
Hill.
> This was 1793.
>
> They were living at MORRISTOWN STATION,  2 boys,  had gone
down to
> duck-pond to get pumpkins or
> roasting ears, or something, last of the summer or fall
1792.   One
> of the young men was killed in
> the field.  The other was taken prisoner,  carried out to
the towns
> and it was supposed killed.  Was
> never heard of afterwards.  This before my father left,
for he
> wanted to pursue,  and  MR. SEWARD
> objected, lest they should kill the son.
>
> I was born at the BELPRE STATION in July 1785, in a camp,
where they
> hadn't got their station built
> yet.  They hadn't gotten there long enough to build a
station.
> Grandfather,  father,  4 brothers
> and a brother in law,  JOHN BARTLETT.      Was at
Maysville a year.
>
> MRS. COLEMAN    lived in Morristown.  Used to weave.
> Indian Hill.  So called because the trace went up it, that
went out
> and crossed Indian riffle.
>
> JOHN BEASLEY had a station just down here where Plainville
is,
> between the rail-road and Armstrong's
> Mill. When he came to the door, it was, they wounded him:
and it
> wasn't him that shot the indian.
> One of the boys shot the indian. There were two of his own
boys  WM
> & JOSEPH BEASLEY,  and 3,
> JOHN, NICK, and ISAIAH PRICHETT, steps sons.  2 beaches
about 8 feet
> apart.  No sycamore there.
> Wounded the indian, but never got him.  An Indian was
behind each of
> those trees.  In 1792 or 1793.
>
> REASON BAILEY , in 1793, it was.   The tree stood to the
right of
> the road there.  The stump would
> be on the left now.  Tree was very singular;  forked till
there were
> great coves in it.
>
> My mother, in the times the Indians were after Spencer's
canoe, was
> going down to Cinti on foot and
> never saw or heard of it.
>
> Old MR. PAUL and JNO. PAUL, his son, were out hunting hops
when the
> old man was killed.
>
> Our first stopping was at a station immediately below the
mouth of
> the Miami.  We then, after
> leaving the station, were picketed in right where there is
now an
> orchard, on the Miami, opposite
> Morristown.
>
>
From: BA <barich@fuse.net>
To: Hermon Fagley <hermfagley@juno.com>
Date: Fri, 28 Dec 2001 17:14:30 -0500
Subject: Draper's Ky Papers: Interview with Robt Giffin
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DRAPER  KENTUCKY PAPERS - Interview with Robt Giffin,
undated
Read from film  13 CC  97-100

Transcribed below with all original punctuation,
capitalization, and
underlining. - BAR
.

Robt.Giffin lived at Columbia.  Had gone out hunting
turkeys.  Was  shot
to the left hand side of
the road below Dr. [?Duncan's] place.  The year before
Wayne's Treaty  in
the fall.  We landed the
8th of April 1794, and he was killed that fall.  We landed
11 Dec. 1793.

There are the bullit moulds which were found right on the
spot in a few
feet of where he fell.
Found 43 or 44 year after, by his nephew, and the ground had
been
ploughed over and over again.
The Indians took his gun, shot-pouch and scalp.  But none
of his
clothing.   Paul came along just
then.  I had to go and warn.   It was after night before
they got in.
 Paul had been out hunting
his _ _ _.   He and his son.   Wm. Paul, a native of
Scotland, though
long in America  and his son
John.   They heard the gun and their dog bark.  (Paul had a
great big
black dog)  and this scalp
yell.   They said there were Indians and began to make to
the station.
The dog having barking at
the Indians and coming back to his master,  they knew that
was the way to
some whites that were
there.     The old man was a scotchman.   Told him,  John,
to run & save
himself;  he was getting
exhausted, the Indians would have him.  He went on.   The
Indians were
behind a popular;  about
breast high it forked.   The stump is there yet. =     The
dog went back
over the crawfish hills.
And Paul & his son took the opposite direction ;   thinking
they would
follow the dog and they might
escape of the Miami.   But the Indians discovered them.
They would have
gone on that way, as at
first,  if the dogs hadn't barked  =   Two hound-dogs they
had.  And they
had started that way,  and
when they saw the dogs go on,  they turned off. & round to
the right in
the opposite direction.  =
They shot old   Mr. Paul  right in the back and out above
his navel, and
he pitched forward on his
knees.    John was about 30 yards ahead,  and  [tree_ _ ] ,
and shot at
the Indian as he sunk the
tomahawk in his father's head.     The smoke continued so
that he
couldn't see,  but he feels
assured he must have struck him,  for all fear had left him,
and he shot
as calmly as he ever did
in his life.   The party that went out, however, could see
no signs.
It was a beautiful day in
Indian summer.  The Indians had been defeated,  the people
were not
afraid,  and Mr. Paul would have
laughed at one to have told him there was danger.  He had
just built him
a strong-house, with post
holes, outside of the station.    The station was picketed
in.   Had at
one time as many as 10-12
families in it.   Had  8  houses.  Just where Widow Landon
lives.

Griffin lived down on the Miami, at Columbia, between Miami
and Ohio

James McCashen,  from Pitt, st came in 1791.  Raised a crop
at Columbia;
and in 1792, went out he &
his bro.
John , & settled Red-bank Station.

Rev. Mr. Steel married John Pauls sister

Jas. McCashen,  John McCashen,  Wm. Paul,  Thos. Gavin,
Henry Weaver,
Gabriel Hutchinson,
Jonathan Pitman, Jacobus Lincicum,  Libb[?ens] Marshall,
Thos. [?Ewing
?Eavin's] son in law,  these
were the 1st settlers.

Before Mr. Paul was killed, in the spring 1794,  Benj F.
Orcutt was a
constable.  Had come at a late
hour in the
night. = Lived not more than 150 yards from the Ohio River.
Had a little
enclosure round his house,
and a trough
inside where he could feed his horse when in haste.  He left
his horse in
the yard, (with his saddle
and blanket , (this denied) ) and that night, in the midst
of Columbia  2
Indians came along & took
it.   In the morning when Nelson got up, he observed the
fence down at
his oats patch,  looked and
saw it down,  at the tree,  and indubitable marks of indian
sign.   He
immediately ran in and 5 of
them,  Samuel Nelson,  Stephen Shipman,  Hinson  Hubb,
Thomas Beasley
and Samuel  Nutt,  jumped on
their horses, and overtook them just on the top of Indian
Hill,  near
Major Parker's    One of the
Indians was walking and the other sitting sideways on the
horse.  The las
they shot. Nelson's ball
shot him.  Two fired, but his was the right sized ball.  The
other ran in
a zig-zag course,  and got
away in the
[?spice]  thickets and the underbrush.   the party returned
with the
horse,  scalp &  ______&
indian's blanket, all bloody, and big gun & trinkets and put
these up at
sale, within a 1/4 mile of
Redbank Station,  in 2 or 3 hours.   The news of the scalp
soon spread.
Orcutt stood by and saw
his horse sold without a word.

Samuel Nelson the founder and his father.  Nelson's Station
was smaller,
5, perhaps 6 cabins, and
put quite close;  only a narrow alley between them.

Gordon was taken before we came.  And Reason Bailey.  And
Nathaniel
Reeder.   This Orcutt, the same
(affair).
And Newell was killed before we came.

They were going up from Columbia to Round Bottom met old Mr.
Coleman
(Nyard Coleman) coming back.
He had started to go up, and his dog was with him.  After
going a piece
he turned 2 or 3 times and
tried to get his master to, and at last took hold of him.
Coleman then
went back, and sent the
young men.  This in 1792.[my coment:  following this, "1791"
was included
in brackets]

Had no picketing at Morristown Station.  Had at Nelson's
Station.

They say that the young Seward that was taken;  was going
too fast,  &
they called to him to stop,
but only intending to alarm,  not to kill.  That he was,
and shot.

Mrs. Hutchins, formerly Mrs. Joseph Hinkle,  said the
Indians pursued;
her children ran for life,
and were taken in by her at a window.

Smith's bed clothes were taken the fall or winter we came.
Spring 1794,
or winter.  But they didn't
put ____ up, for he was a preacher.  [my comment: unreadable
word is
underlined, as are most names.
Th_e_ _ _]  Killed one Indian;  the other escaped.

Joseph Reeder is said to have been out on a Creek and seeing
an Indian
fishing,  and good
opportunity to kill, and said well (he thought) if that
indian had as
good a chance as I have
wouldn't he shoot - yes he would and accordingly  raised his
gun and
tipped him over on the log, and
left him lay.  never went to see him.

[ Coming soon,   Interview with Flinn who also talks of this
area -  BAR]
 
 
 



Subject:
       Re: Draper's Ky Papers:Mouth of Little Miami 1791-95
   Date:
       Fri, 28 Dec 2001 18:34:49 -0500
  From:
       HERMON B FAGLEY <hermfagley@juno.com>
    To:
       barich@fuse.net, x1957@aol.com, russcanter@fuse.net, SusiCP@aol.com,
       flyingw@bright.net, swamsley@concentric.net, bobfagley@sisna.com,
       AOFN234@aol.com, KDMS@aol.com, wfamolim@attbi.com, mari@netins.net,
       PSmith7179@aol.com, sarap@widomaker.com, cmontrose@beol.net,
       dmp@ev1.net,
 
 
 

Thank you so much.  Morristown [ex NJ] station is new to
what memory
I have left. Rev Smith is Ohio's 1st US SEN,and merchant,and
miller.He
preach ed
Baptist at  Island Baptist,Newtown. Owned a piece of
Waynesville area.
Got mixed
up in Aaron Burr's plot,and resigned,and went to Bayou
Sarah,La. But,for
10 years plus,he was a big shot of the lower Little Miami.
Dr Goforth? Dr Evan Bane=Bean??????
Your husband,if not you,know Bob Armstrong and his bro who
married,I
think ,
one of the four girls in Latin [Kay being counted tomboy].
We think [?]
he was of
Nathan Shepard Armstrong,whose sons,1800,+ had 3 mills from
Plainville to

TERRACE PARK. Armstrong's Chapel. We think maybe Isaac Vail
near Newtown
became a father-in-law. Can't prove before RT 125 AND RT 222
N ,SAY 1830.
Sherry Phillips m Armstrong,I think. Vail would be
Morristown. Maybe NJ
 

On Fri, 28 Dec 2001 17:14:30 -0500 BA <barich@fuse.net>
writes:
> DRAPER  KENTUCKY PAPERS - Interview with Robt Giffin,
undated
> Read from film  13 CC  97-100
>
> Transcribed below with all original punctuation,
capitalization, and
>  underlining. - BAR
> .
>
> Robt.Giffin lived at Columbia.  Had gone out hunting
turkeys.  Was
> shot to the left hand side of
> the road below Dr. [?Duncan's] place.  The year before
Wayne's
> Treaty  in the fall.  We landed the
> 8th of April 1794, and he was killed that fall.  We landed
11 Dec.
> 1793.
>
> There are the bullit moulds which were found right on the
spot in a
> few feet of where he fell.
> Found 43 or 44 year after, by his nephew, and the ground
had been
> ploughed over and over again.
> The Indians took his gun, shot-pouch and scalp.  But none
of his
> clothing.   Paul came along just
> then.  I had to go and warn.   It was after night before
they got
> in.      Paul had been out hunting
> his _ _ _.   He and his son.   Wm. Paul, a native of
Scotland,
> though long in America  and his son
> John.   They heard the gun and their dog bark.  (Paul had
a great
> big black dog)  and this scalp
> yell.   They said there were Indians and began to make to
the
> station.   The dog having barking at
> the Indians and coming back to his master,  they knew that
was the
> way to some whites that were
> there.     The old man was a scotchman.   Told him,  John,
to run &
> save himself;  he was getting
> exhausted, the Indians would have him.  He went on.   The
Indians
> were behind a popular;  about
> breast high it forked.   The stump is there yet. =     The
dog went
> back over the crawfish hills.
> And Paul & his son took the opposite direction ;
thinking they
> would follow the dog and they might
> escape of the Miami.   But the Indians discovered them.
They would
> have gone on that way, as at
> first,  if the dogs hadn't barked  =   Two hound-dogs they
had.  And
> they had started that way,  and
> when they saw the dogs go on,  they turned off. & round to
the right
> in the opposite direction.  =
> They shot old   Mr. Paul  right in the back and out above
his
> navel, and he pitched forward on his
> knees.    John was about 30 yards ahead,  and  [tree_ _ ]
, and shot
> at the Indian as he sunk the
> tomahawk in his father's head.     The smoke continued so
that he
> couldn't see,  but he feels
> assured he must have struck him,  for all fear had left
him,  and he
> shot as calmly as he ever did
> in his life.   The party that went out, however, could see
no signs.
>     It was a beautiful day in
> Indian summer.  The Indians had been defeated,  the people
were not
> afraid,  and Mr. Paul would have
> laughed at one to have told him there was danger.  He had
just built
> him a strong-house, with post
> holes, outside of the station.    The station was picketed
in.   Had
> at one time as many as 10-12
> families in it.   Had  8  houses.  Just where Widow Landon
lives.
>
> Griffin lived down on the Miami, at Columbia, between
Miami and Ohio
>
> James McCashen,  from Pitt, st came in 1791.  Raised a
crop at
> Columbia;  and in 1792, went out he &
> his bro.
> John , & settled Red-bank Station.
>
> Rev. Mr. Steel married John Pauls sister
>
> Jas. McCashen,  John McCashen,  Wm. Paul,  Thos. Gavin,
Henry
> Weaver,  Gabriel Hutchinson,
> Jonathan Pitman, Jacobus Lincicum,  Libb[?ens] Marshall,
Thos.
> [?Ewing ?Eavin's] son in law,  these
> were the 1st settlers.
>
> Before Mr. Paul was killed, in the spring 1794,  Benj F.
Orcutt was
> a constable.  Had come at a late
> hour in the
> night. = Lived not more than 150 yards from the Ohio
River.  Had a
> little enclosure round his house,
> and a trough
> inside where he could feed his horse when in haste.  He
left his
> horse in the yard, (with his saddle
> and blanket , (this denied) ) and that night, in the midst
of
> Columbia  2 Indians came along & took
> it.   In the morning when Nelson got up, he observed the
fence down
> at his oats patch,  looked and
> saw it down,  at the tree,  and indubitable marks of
indian sign.
> He immediately ran in and 5 of
> them,  Samuel Nelson,  Stephen Shipman,  Hinson  Hubb,
Thomas
> Beasley and Samuel  Nutt,  jumped on
> their horses, and overtook them just on the top of Indian
Hill,
> near Major Parker's    One of the
> Indians was walking and the other sitting sideways on the
horse.
> The las they shot. Nelson's ball
> shot him.  Two fired, but his was the right sized ball.
The other
> ran in a zig-zag course,  and got
> away in the
> [?spice]  thickets and the underbrush.   the party
returned with the
> horse,  scalp &  ______&
> indian's blanket, all bloody, and big gun & trinkets and
put these
> up at sale, within a 1/4 mile of
> Redbank Station,  in 2 or 3 hours.   The news of the scalp
soon
> spread.   Orcutt stood by and saw
> his horse sold without a word.
>
> Samuel Nelson the founder and his father.  Nelson's
Station was
> smaller,  5, perhaps 6 cabins, and
> put quite close;  only a narrow alley between them.
>
> Gordon was taken before we came.  And Reason Bailey.  And
Nathaniel
> Reeder.   This Orcutt, the same
> (affair).
> And Newell was killed before we came.
>
> They were going up from Columbia to Round Bottom met old
Mr. Coleman
> (Nyard Coleman) coming back.
> He had started to go up, and his dog was with him.  After
going a
> piece he turned 2 or 3 times and
> tried to get his master to, and at last took hold of him.
Coleman
> then went back, and sent the
> young men.  This in 1792.[my coment:  following this,
"1791" was
> included in brackets]
>
> Had no picketing at Morristown Station.  Had at Nelson's
Station.
>
> They say that the young Seward that was taken;  was going
too fast,
> & they called to him to stop,
> but only intending to alarm,  not to kill.  That he was,
and shot.
>
> Mrs. Hutchins, formerly Mrs. Joseph Hinkle,  said the
Indians
> pursued;  her children ran for life,
> and were taken in by her at a window.
>
> Smith's bed clothes were taken the fall or winter we came.
Spring
> 1794, or winter.  But they didn't
> put ____ up, for he was a preacher.  [my comment:
unreadable word is
> underlined, as are most names.
> Th_e_ _ _]  Killed one Indian;  the other escaped.
>
> Joseph Reeder is said to have been out on a Creek and
seeing an
> Indian fishing,  and good
> opportunity to kill, and said well (he thought) if that
indian had
> as good a chance as I have
> wouldn't he shoot - yes he would and accordingly  raised
his gun and
> tipped him over on the log, and
> left him lay.  never went to see him.
>
> [ Coming soon,   Interview with Flinn who also talks of
this area -
> BAR]
>
>
>