BATTLE OF KINGS MOUNTAIN

Elder Thomas Dixon Sr. was pastor of Double Springs Baptist
                    Church from January 1868 through December 1870. He was
                    "chosen for supply" for each of these three reconstruction years.

                    He was born in York County, South Carolina, on December 24,
                    1820, the son of David Dixon. His grandfather was Colonel
                    Frederick Hambright, a hero of the battle of Kings Mountain. He
                    was baptized by Elder James M. Thomas in 1838, and was
                    ordained to the ministry in 1844. He had poor educational
                    advantages, having learned to read in sabbath school, which at the
                    request of the superintendent, he frequently opened with prayer.

Old Shiloh Presbyterian Cemetery, burial place of Col. Frederick Hambright


Battle of Kings Mountain Patriot Roster - October 7, 1780
http://www.tcarden.com/tree/ensor/Kingsmountainroster.html
Kings Mountain Battlefield is Located in South Carolina on the North Carolina border

Sellers, James

Hambrick, Benjamin
Hambright, Frederick, Lieut. Colonel
Hambright, John Hardin
Hambright, John, Lieutenant

=

Rev War James Sellers letter, etc, forwarded to Hambright in TN (get exact wording here, msh)

=

There are compiled lists out there of soldiers who served at the Battle of Kings Mountain in 1780 and they do list a certain James Sellers. There are no sources to this list, so they should be used with caution. It is possible that the James Sellers (~1759-1842) of Grainger Co., TN could have participated if he was in a militia company. Typically soldiers were entitled to a pension for Continental service only, so if they served in the militia they would have left that service out of their pension statement. I have seen this before for an ancestral uncle of mine, Samuel Sellers, of Harrison Co., KY. He only mentioned his Continental service in the 8th Pennsylvania Regiment in his pension statement, but afterward he also served in the Westmoreland Co., PA militia.

The unsourced compiled list is probably where some are getting the information that a James Sellers served in the Battle of Kings Mountain. Since James Sellers' continental service was in 1779 then its possible he served at King's Mountain in 1780. I'm just saying its possible. Of course more research would be needed on that battle to prove it true.

Jim Sellars  
Jim Sellars <jimsellars@ymail.com>

________________________________
 From: Ann Kent <akent616@aol.com>
To: lindapeacock@vip.cybercity.dk; sellers@rootsweb.com; mike@sellersknives.com; sellerka@yahoo.com; sammjsm57@aol.com
Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2012 8:20 PM
Subject: Re: [SELLERS] SELLERS LINE - RESPONSE TO MY QUERY TO MY COUSINS AS TOTHEIR PROOF
 

Well said, Linda

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Linda Peacock <lindapeacock@vip.cybercity.dk>
To: sellers <sellers@rootsweb.com>; mike <mike@sellersknives.com>; 'Ann Kent' <akent616@aol.com>; sellerka <sellerka@yahoo.com>; Sam Sellers <sammjsm57@aol.com>
Sent: Tue, May 29, 2012 5:57 pm
Subject: Re: [SELLERS] SELLERS LINE - RESPONSE TO MY QUERY TO MY COUSINS AS TOTHEIR PROOF

 

Carole and all,

Just to make sure we are on the same page as to which James Sellers we are
discussing, it is James Sellers b. abt 1759 and who d. 1843 in Grainger Co.,
TN - correct? This James Sellers, in his pension statement, said he enlisted
from Chatham NC in 1779 (2 Nov) and served until 2 Aug 1780. James said he
served in the "Battle of Stono" (that was 20 Jun 1779 near Charleston, SC).
James never said he fought in Battle of Kings Mountain, fought 7 Oct 1780
(so after James mustered out). Neither dates would fit his service, though
he said he fought under Matthew Ramsey who was a commander at Stono Ferry,
so most likely James got his dates mixed up as to enlistment and he enlisted
earlier than he thought. He was certainly given a pension, but what is odd
about the stories about him is that people claim he fought at Kings
Mountain, which he never claimed himself, and that his pension was based on
his fighting at Stono Ferry, which he himself claimed. This is just an aside
as to James´ actual service in the Am Rev.

As to the "TN cousins", some people still believe the Earth is flat and
nothing will convince them that it is not.. Not much one can do than try, as
you did, Carole, to convince them otherwise. It is frustrating, I know. But
you did your best and I guess that is that as to the TN Cousins. All we can
do is to try to insist on correcting the record so others who are more open
to reasoning, can get the correct message as to their ancestry. It continues
to amaze me that some people just want to latch on to a false story as to
their ancestors as opposed to finding the facts. What I have always
appreciated here, is Marie´s insistance that people prove their data insofar
as possible. And have always appreciated the input, from knowledgeable
people here. This is an exceptional site due to Marie´s efforts. This is a
site where people cannot just get by with believing the world is flat, as to
their Sellers ancestors.

Linda

=

REV WAR FILE OF JAMES SELLERS
contributed by Linda Peacock [lindapeacock@vip.cybercity.dk]
This is the short version of James Sellers´s file. I have many more pages from Footnote if you want them all. I have sent those to Larry, previously. Linda


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NOTES RELATING TO THE BLACK AND HAMBRIGHT FAMILIES OF BLOUNT COUNTY

GEORGE BLACK AND COL. FREDERICK HAMBRIGHT OF LINCOLN CO. N. C.

After a lapse of nearly TWO CENTURIES it has obviously been a matter of impossibility to assemble all the many details of the history of the BLACK and HAMBRIGHT families, who settled in BLOUNT COUNTY contemporaneously with GEORGE EWING, the McTEERS, BOGLRS and other pioneer families, who came there with them from the CATAWBA VALLEY in North Carolina.

The high lights of the story of these families, however, may be found here and there in different source records, and what is told here, is based upon those sources.

That GEORGE HLACK came from CECIL CO., MARYLAND, with other members of the NOTTINGHAM COLONY that formed the old Buffalo Presbyterian Church in CUILFORD COUNTY, and himself secured land on REEDY FORK, appears on page 23 of Dr. S. M. Rankin's History of the old Buffalo Church in Guilford County, N. Carolina.

Mrs. Puett's History of Gaston County N. C. and William L. Sherrill's "Annals of Lincoln County" both relate the story of the signing of the TRYON DECLARATION OF INDEPEN??ENCE in Tryon County, N. C. and Dr. Sherrill's work contains a reproduction of the signstures attached thereto. There were 49 signatures, inoluding JOHN WALKER, the Chairman, too many to set out in full, here, but among them were the following:

JOHN WALKER, Chairman. (1)
FREDERICK HAMBRICHT (2)
ANDREW HAMPTOW (3)
JOSEPH HARDIN (4)
GEORGE BLACK (5)
BENJAMIN HARDIN (6)
JOHN ROBINSON (7)
ROBERT ALKIANDER (8)


Every name on the list is NOW of historical interest, but those we have selected above will serve to enlighton this story of the BLACKS and the HAMBRI??HTS. A brief referance to each one named, by way of historical identification, will apprise the reader of the character of men who signed the document referred to above.

(1) JOHN WALKER, CHAIRMAN

JOHN WALKER, the Chairman was born in Cecil County, Maryland, and settled in the Valley of Virginia on Walker's Creek in what is perhaps now ROCKBRIDGE COUNTY, then moved from there to THYON (the pt now LINCOLN COUNTY), where he lived for a time and took part in the stirring evens preceding the revolution, then went over into the more mountainous section of Western North Carolina, where he died. He raised a family of several so?? and among them was FEL?? WALKER - who went to the Watang?? Valley in Washington County (now Tennessee) and was Clerk of the Court; then FELIX went back over the mountains and helped to organize the new County of BUNCOMRE, and was sent to the U. S. Congress, where he served long enough to become famouse with the "BUNCOMBE" speach; in his later years he settled over in Mississippi, where he died. The WILLIAM WALKER, w??o with O??. JAMES WHITE, patanted lands on the Clinch River West of Knoxville and left a will in 1796 - which will is shown in the Knox County notes, herein, may have been related to these Walkers. Some of these Walkers married into the family of BENJAMIN HOWARD of Ashe County, including the JOSEPH WAIKER, who settled in MONROE COUNTY, in the Flat Creek Valley on the line between Monroe and McMinn Counties

(2) COL. FREDERICK HAMERIGHT

COL. FREDERICK HAMBRIGHT (no. 2) - as we have listed him, was from Virginia, where he married a sister (SARAH) of COL. JOSEPH HARDIN, JOHN HARDIN and B??NJAMIN HARDIN & was their brother in law. The two families came down out of VIRGINIA into T??ON COUNTY, with the KU??KENDALLS, WHITESIDES and others, and later, the HARDINS moved over inte EAST TENNESSEE. HARDIN COUNTY, in Tennessee, bears the name of this family. He had several children by his marriage to SARAH HARD??



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after SARAH had died, he married in 1781, and by her had about ten children. The children of COLONEL FREDERICK HAMBRIGHT by his first marriage to Sarah Hardin were:

1. CAPT. JOHN H. HAMBRIGHT who married
NANCY BLACK.
2. ELIZABETH HAMBRIGHT married JOSEPH
JENKINS.
3. SARAH HAMBRIGHT m. GAVIN BLACK.
4. MAJOR FREDERICK HAMBRIGHT. JR.,
married MARY BAKER or EAKER.
5. HENJAMIN HAMBRIGHT (Said to
have moved to KENTUCKY (possibly
to Tennessee, instead.)
6. JAMES HAMBRIGHT also said to have
moved to KENTUCKY (And he may
have settled in TENNESSEE, instead,
at least for awhile.)
7. SOPHIA HAMBRIGHT married a man by
the name of QUINN


The last named is said to have been a child by his second mariage, by one source, but by the first wife by another authority.

The children of COL. FREDERICK HAMBRIGHT and his second wife MARY DOVER were: LOTT??E (m. NORTON;) POLLY, (m. PRICE) DAVID, HENRY. LAWSON and JOSIAH, A??NER, and a daughter SUSAN.

I have no sort of doubt but what NANCY ??LACK and GAVIN BLACK were brother and sister and smong the several children of GEORGE BLACK, who s??quired lands on BUFFALO CREEK and REEDY FORK in Guilford County, North Carolina, about 1753, and whose children were:

1. THOMAS HLACK m. REBECCA DENNY
2. DAVID BLACK
3. GAVIN BLACK m. SARAH HAMBRIGHT
4. JOHN BLACK
5. WILLIAM BLACK
6. JOSEPH BLACK (Of HLOUNT Co.)
7. NANCY BLACK m. JOHN H.HAMBRIGHT


In 1762, THOMAS BLACK bought land on the South Side of INDIAN CREEK, in TRYON (Then ANSON, later TRYON and then LINCOIN) County, N. C. Later he settled near SHELBY, in what is now CLEVELAND COUNTY. He had a son - EPHRAIM BLACK moved back to the va??inity of Indian Creek and bought the lands where CHERRYVILLE is now located and divided it between two of his sons STEPHEN BLACK and THOMAS BLACK. Stepehn Bleck and his wife set out cherry trees along the old road leading to the village and it gave the name to the town, while the old road was called "CHEERY LANE". Ever afterwards this family was called the "BLAC??S OF CHERRY LANE". One of their neighbors was WILLIAM HAMMONTREE with 5 sons and 3 daughters.

(3) COL. ANDREW HAMPTON

COL. ANDREW HAMPTON, who signed the TRYON DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE in August, 1775, with GEORGE BLACK, COL. FREDEICK HAMBRIGHT and others, was an early-day patriot, who served in the North Carolina troop?? as a CAPTAIN as far back as 1754. So far as any record has been found to establish it as a fact is concerned, he was not closely related to the famous WADE HAMPTON, of revolutionary fame. He was independently famous on his own secount. He died in 1805 in what was RUTHERFORD COUNTY, North Carolina. Some of his sons, settled in that part of North Carolina that became East Tennessee.One was living on the Watauga when that settlement was young - JONATHAN and his son NOAH HAMPTON. The will of Col. ANDREW was proved in Rutherford County, dated July 20, 1805. He named children:

1. WASHINGTON HAMPTON
2. ELIZABETH HAMPTON m. PRICE
3. NANCY HAMPTON m. BRADLEY
4. JONATHAN HAMPTON (Son NOAH)
5. SUSANNA HAMPTON
6. ANDREW HAMPTON
7. JOHN HAMPTON
8. BENJAMIN ALCIE HAMPTON
9. RACHEL HAMPTON
10. MARY HAMPTON
11. ADAM HAMPTON
12. MICHAEL HAMPTON
13. ANTHONY HAMPTON.


His will was witnessed by CHARLES LEWIS and THOMAS ROWLAND.

(4) JOSEPH HARDIN (6) BENJAMIN HARDIN

These two brothers were brothers of SARAH HARDIN, the wife of COL. FREDERICK HAMBRI??HT. They afterwards settled in Tennessee, and other references have ben and will be made to them in these notes.

(5) GEORGE BLACK

GEORGE BLACK, as already shown in these notes, was the ancestor of the CHERRY LANE BLACKS, whose relatives came to East Eannessee and settled in BLOUNT, KNOX and MO??ROE COUNTIES. More later.




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(7) JOHN ROBINSON

JOHN ROBINSON was another whose signature is attached to the TRYON DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE in August, 1775. Descendants of this JOHN ROBINSON are, and have been for nearly two centuries, unaware of the identity of this man and patriot. His name, spelled as it is and signed, as it is, to this document, has caused researchers to overlook the ancestor of the great family of the name ROBERTSON, that had so much to do with building the great State of TENNESSEE. This was JOHN ROBERTSON, father of GEN. JAMES ROBERTSON, the founder of MASHVILLE, TENNESSEE, whose history is replete with interest. This writer has so identified him, and in later notes will endeavor to demon - strate that he is correct.

(8) COL. ROBERT ALEXANDER

COL. ROBERT ALEXANDER. He commanded a company in the Cherokee expedition and was a Captain in the revolution. His wife was MARY JACK, sister of Captain JAMES JACK who carried the Mecklenburg Declaration to Philadelphia. He came from CECIL COUNTY, Md. with the other ALEXANDERS of Mecklenburg County, and settled on the West side of the Catawba river in the neighborhood og the BLACKS and HAMBRIGHTS. He died in 1813 at the age of about 70 years.

THE HAMBRIGHTS AND BLACKS WHO WENT OVER INTO TENNESSEE

The detailed records of both BLACKS and HAMBRIGHTS for the pariod beginning at the and of the revolution & for about one full generation thereafter are absent and can not be found. They can be filled in any by deductions based upon the few soattered notes in Tennessee, North Carolina & a little family tradition mi??ed.

That COL. JOHN H. HAMBRIGHT, married NANCY BLACK is a matter of family record, as well as tradition. That she was a sister of GAVIN BLACK, is indicated strongly by the fact that one of their sons was GAVIN HAMBRIGHT. That her brother, GAVIN BLACK, married SARAH HAMBRIGHT is arrived at by assuming that it would have been, for that day and time, a probability.

It was practically a custom among families of this size for a brother to marry a sister of the friend who married HIS sister. NANCY BLACK was undoubtedly a sister of GAVIN BLACK. She married JOHN H. HAMBRIGHT and had a son GAVIN HAMBRIGHT. GAVIN BLACK, her brother, than married SARAH HAMBRIGHT, and they had a son HAMBRIGHT BLACK.

In 1817 in BLOUNT COUNTY, TENNESSEE, HAMBRIGHT BLACK married MARY W. BARRY; In 1816 URIAH BLACK married ELIZABETH THOMPSON, and JOSEPH BLACK married MARY HAMMONTREE. The Barrys and Hammontrees came from the same neighborhood in LINCOLN COUNTY, N. C.

It is a matter of history that JOHN H. HAMBRIGHT and his wife NANCY BLACK ca??e over into TENNESSEE and settled in BLOUNT COUNTY. It is a matter of history that GAVIN BLACK in 1796 was a Lieutenant in the Blount County militia, and that HUGH and SAMUEL BOELE, who lived near BLACK'S STATION (Fort) in Blount County, were associated in the same militia organization as officers, with GAVIN BLACK. (Tenn. Historical Quarterly Vol. 1 p. 82). It is also a matter of history that JAS. H. BLACK married NANCY BOGLE in 1837, and that SAMUEL BOELE and ROBERT BOGLE (See 1790 Gensus) were neighbors of the BLACKS back in the old home section of North Carolina.

JOHN H. HAMBRIGHT and his wife NANCY BLACK, by the actual record, were parents of:

1. BENJAMIN HAMBRIGHT
2. AMOS HAMBRIGHT (Lived in Knox County,
Tennessee).
3. GAVIN HAMBRIGHT.
4. JOHN HAMBRIGHT, JR.
5. FREDERICK HAMBRIGHT
6. JANE HAMBRIGHT
7. BETSY HAMBRICHT.


GAVIN BLACK, who married SARAH HAMBRIGHT, came to BLOUNT COUNTY, TENNESSEE and brought with them at least one son, under 16 years of age. Then, in the years following, when actual records are to be found, names of persons who were undoubtedly sons of GAVIN BLACK begin to appear in the locality where they lived. So we naturally conclude they ware parents of:

1. LIEUT. GAVIN BLACK (b. ca 1777)
2. JOHN S. BLACK m. MARY ....?
3. HAMBRIGHT BLACK (b.1791)
4. URIAH BLACK (b. ca 1793)
5. MARCUS D. BLACK
6. WASHINGTON M. BLACK.


And of course, prebably some daughters.




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JOHN BLACK, BROTHER OF GAVIN, AND SON OF GEORGE BLACK.

THOMAS, DAVID and WILLIAM BLACK, all sons of the "TRYON SIGNER", GEORGE BLACK, remained in NORTH CAROLINA, & THOMAS, through his son EPHRAIM became the ancestor of the "??HERHY LANE" Blacks, heretogore related. GAVIN BLACK and his wife NANCY HAMBRIGHT settled at "BLACK'S STATION" which was their home, in BLOUNT COUNTY, Tennessee; JOHN BLACK also came to BLOUNT COUNTY and settled on Nine Mile Creek where they lived and died and raised a large family of children, and NANCY BLACK and her husband JOHN H. HAMBRIGHT came to BLOUNT COUNTY, also, but after a good many years moved down into McMINN COUNTY, when the Cherokee lands were opened up about 1820, where they died, leaving many descendants.

So far as this writer knows there was no actual relationship between the RAY FAMILY and the BLACKS, but, for some reason the two families appear to have been on intimate terms for a long period of time.

WILL PARHAM, of Maryville, in Blount County, once inveatigated the history of some of the RAY FAMILY, including the great uncle of this writer, a certain OBEDIAH RAY, and reported in a letter that the story he had was that while on his way over the mountains from North Carolina, OBEDIAH RAY met up with JOHN BLACK "who had been back on a visit" and that fall the two of them raised a crop of corn on Little Tennessee River near the mouth of the famous Nine-Mile Creek. Thereafter these two families continued to live in that section and the members of the two families are all buried together at the old Baker's Creek Presbyterian Churchyard in BLOUNT COUNTY, including the writer's grandfather. OBEDIAH RAY lived to the ripe age of 101 years. Hon. Charles L. Black, Attorney, who lives in Anstin, Teras, a direct descendant of GAVIN BLACK and SARAH HAMBRIGHT, informs the writer that there was smong the Black descendants of the later generations, a WILL PARHAM BLACK.

JOSEPH BLACK, another son of GEORGE & brother of GAVIN and JOHN mentioned above, was one of the seven commissioners s??lected to locate the county seat of BLOUNT COUNTY, TENNESSEE, in 1795. Those on the commission with him were WILLIAM WALLACE, COL. DAVID CRAIC, SAMUEL GLASS, SAMUEL HENRY, JOHN TRIMBLE, ALE?? KELLEY and SAMUEL HENRY. This JOSEPH BLACK, however did not remain in BLOUNT COUNTY, but moved later to ANDERSON COUNTY, where he took an important part in the early development of that section and left many descendants. (See Anderson Co. Notes.)

GAVIN HAMBRIGHT, SON OF JOHN H. HAMBRIGHT AND NANCY BLACK

GAVIN HAMBRIGHT, son of CAPT. JOHN H. HAMBRIGHT and his wife NANCY BLACK - was born Sept. 3, 1803, and died in McMINN County, Tennessee, in 1882. Gaving Hambright married MISS ELIZA BLACK of McMinn County, which indicates that some of the BLACKS also settled in McMinn County when the Indian lands were opened up in 1820. They had children:

1. MARY T. HAMBRIGHT (1836-1909) m.
SAMUEL P. HOWARD, son of WILLIAM
HOWARD. Saveral of the Howard
children located in Teras.
2. PENELOPE HAMBRIGHT m. her cousin,
JOHN HAMBRIGHT and moved to
Texas.
3. BENJAMIN F. HAMBRIGHT.
4. JAMES ROBERT HAMBRIGHT (1843-1913)
Bradley County, Tenn.
5. JOHN T. HAMBRIGHT m. HUMPHRIES.
6. VESTA JANE HAMBRIGHT
7. HETTIE AMANDA HAMBRIGHT
8. MATTIE ISABELL HAMBRIGHT.
9. OLIVER W. HAMBRIGHT m. JONES.
10. SAMUEL H. HAMBRIGHT
11. BLACK HAMBRIGHT (Of Atlanta, Ga.)
12. FRANE MONROE HAMBRIGHT.
13. ??ARON BYRD HAMBRIGHT (Old Bach??lor)


DESCENDANTS OF GAVIN BLACK AND HIS WIFE SARAH, WHO WENT TO TEXAS.

GAVIN BLACK, JR. (Lieutenant) and the brother URIAH BLACK, probably remained in BLOUNT and MONROE COUNTIES, in Tennessee, but the Texas Land Records show that lands were patented in that State in a very early day to JOHN S. BLACK, HAMBRIGHT BLACK, MAROUS BLACK and WASHINGTON M. BLACK. Whether all of these brothers, which they seem to have been, remained in Texas, or merely obtained and then sold their lands to speculators, no one seems to know. Many of the patents were issued the same day, and the lands patented to them were always contiguous, indiesting undoubted relationship. JOHN S. BLACK lived and died in Texas.




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JOHN S. BLACK WHO WENT TO TEXAS WITH THE STERLING C. ROBERTSON COLONY.

JOHN S. BLACK, the son of GAVIN BLACK and his wife SARAH HAMBRIGHT went to Texas with the STERLING C. ROBERTSON colonists and took up lands in the old MILAM DISTRICT. MARCUS D. BLACK, and WASHINGTON M. BLACK, joined him there, but it appears that before this time these two brothers had probably settled in ALABAMA, from whence they went to TEXAS.

HAMBRIGHT BLACK, who was a well-known merchant at MADISONVILLE, in Monroe County, for several years, patented lands in Texas about the same time, but it is not known whether these brothere remained in Texas or not. The only authentie record we have found in regard to them is where they were swarded lands. JOHN S. BLACK, however, who was born about 1790. settled in what is now GRIMES COUNTY early enough to have joined the Texas army, with one of his oldest sons, MONR??E BLACK. The name of his wife was MARY, and they had the following children:

1. MONROE BLACK
2. GAVIN BIN??LEY BLACK (b. 1822)
3. JOHN S. BLACK, JR.
4. LUCINDA BLACK
5. WILLIAM BLACK.


GAVIN BINGLEY BLACK, who patented lands South of the PALUXY river in what was then McLENNAN COUNTY, Texas, near JOHN S. (his father or his brother) and WASHINGTON M. BLACK, his uncle, married MARWARET ANNA MOORE, by whom he had thirteen children: JOHN M., GEORGE PATRICK, HENRIETTA, RICHARD, CHARLES L., FRANK, ANNA MAE, TOM C. B., HAMBRIGHT, MARY ANN, GAVIN B., SALLIE MIKE and JESSE LEE BLACK. JOHN M. BLACK was a deaf mute; GEO. PATRICK was a deputy sheriff of GRIMES COUNTY, who married and had seven children, including a GAVIN BLACK. He married Kate Grissett, as his first wife & IRENE MAYFIELD, second, in 1891. Some of the children settled in the city of Houston, some in Bryan, and some of the Mayfields live in Austin, Texas, the home of Hon?? CHARIES L. BLACK, distingutshed Texas lawyer, and the son of THOMAS C. B. BLACK. HAMBRIGHT H. BLACK married PARA LEE HORTON, and after her decease, her sister DXIA HORTON. This Hambright Black had a son CHARLES BLACK, who went to Merico. The descendants of this family are seattered all over Texas.

PROFFESSOR CLEMMER AND THE OLD MORGANTON ACADEMY

At this point the writer begs permission to flip back through the pages of memory to the old MORGANTON ACADEMY, on the banks of the limpid waters of the LITTLE TENNESSEE RIVER, run by one "Professor CLEMMER", an erudite pedegog of another era, who hailed from LINCOIN COUNTY, North Carolina, from which came the BLACKS, the EWINGS, the McCONNELLS, the WHITES & the HAMBRIGHTS, families he has been writing about in the pages immediately preceding. In looking over Judge Hoffman's account of LINCOIN COUNTY (N. C.) families I found the Black descendants and the Hambrights and scattered among them, the CLEMMERS, including PERRY, ANDREW, JONAS, FAYETTE, JOHN L., MILES and GEORGE CLEMMER'S children. JOHN L. CLEMMER was one of the organizers of the STOWE THREAD MILLS on the South Fork of the Catawba, near the home of the BLACKS and HAMBRIGHTS in the early 1840s, and the others date back beyond 1800, many of them. PROFESSOR CLEMMER, of "Marganton Academy", where the writer in his adolescent days was an inapt pupil, was of this same North Carolina stock. Among the other pupils I can remember faintly FRANE, JOE and CAMPHELL BLACK and others of the name; there were seven or eight of these Black boys. These Blacks were well fixed and lived at or hear a picturesque little place on the banks of "Nine Mile", and I am told father HLACK left each of his many children a farm of 100 or more acres at the time of his death. Most of them were older than I and some were in the higher classes and studies when we were there. Frank Black married a Pearson (Corrie, I think it was) and left several children. Then there was TOM REAGAN & his sister MARY, who married one of the TIPTORS, who worked in the KIMBROUGH store, and their daughter became the wife of BEN RAY, uncle Geo. W. Bay's son. The "Aeadamy" was full of Tiptons - of the old strain. ALEX McCLAIN and one of the McCONNELL boys and Floyd HOMARD were in the near-grown-up class and were bearding students from Hlount County. Fanny Lowrey, a ??in of mine, was the grand-daughter of Uncle Adam Cenada and his wife AUNT BETBY and daughter of cousin ELIZA and BILL LOWREY. Fanny married CLAIBORNE THOMPSON, of the old THOMPSON strain, inte which the Blacks married.




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